Volunteer

Put your talent, passion and energy to use in the parks. Whether you're by yourself or with a group, Three Rivers has ongoing and short-term volunteer openings for many interests. From turtle monitors to program interpreters to park patrollers and more, you’ll find plenty of ways to give back, and feel good doing it.

No matter the season, Three Rivers has opportunities for volunteers to get involved in environmental stewardship projects, special events, programs and more happening across the parks.

Volunteers are needed to assist at events, programs and with planning. One-time helpers are welcome.

Talk to a volunteer coordinator in person at one of the Three Rivers’ Explore Volunteering open houses.

Each year, the Distinguished Volunteer Service Award Recipients contribute to the community and have an amazing level of commitment to their service at Three Rivers. 

Individual and group ongoing and short-term opportunities are available for a variety of ages and skills.

Resources and information for current volunteers.

Looking for ways to get involved? Three Rivers offers several ongoing volunteer opportunities for teens.

Contact Us

For more information, call 763-559-6706 or email volunteer@ThreeRiversParks.org. Keep track of all the available volunteering opportunities with our Spring/Summer newsletter.

Related Blog Posts

June 28, 2021

Since 1988, Gene Lau has given more than 10,000 hours of his time to Three Rivers — more than any other volunteer we've had. Learn all about Gene's volunteer roles, why he enjoys it and how he ended up contributing so much time. 

June 14, 2021

When an invasive species isn't immediately eradicated, things can get tough to control. Learn about the most widespread invasive species in Three Rivers and how we and our wonderful volunteers manage them to protect our high-quality forests.

February 03, 2020

Around the Twin Cities, there is a woody vine that looks similar to one of our native vines — but is highly invasive. Read on to learn why oriental bittersweet is a problem, how to distinguish it from American bittersweet and what you can do to help.